Famous Campbeltonians

IF you want to find out more about the local history of Kintyre or post some interesting stories then here is the place! All contributors welcome! You can also check out the Historic Kintyre and Down Memory Lane websites.

Re: Famous Campbeltonians

Postby bill » Tue Feb 07, 2012 10:12 pm

Surprising Neil McBain has not been mentioned.

Born in Campbeltown 15th.Nov.1895 he went on to play for Manchester United/Everton and Liverpool among others.

He also played three times for Scotland,which includes a 1-0 win over England.



http://www.aboutmanutd.com/man-u-player ... cbain.html

http://www.liverpoolfc.tv/history/past- ... eil-mcbain

http://www.evertonfc.com/stats/?mode=pl ... yer_id=463
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Re: Famous Campbeltonians

Postby bill » Sun Feb 19, 2012 4:26 pm

Sir Kieran Prendergast KCVO, CMG,born July 1942 in Campbeltown, Scotland.

" Mr. Prendergast was educated in Australia at St. Patrick's College, Strathfield, Sydney, and in England at Salesian College, Chertsey and St. Edmund Hall, Oxford. Fluent in French and Turkish, he has lived in nine countries and has visited many others.

Kieran Prendergast was appointed Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs by Secretary-General Kofi Annan, effective 1 March 1997.
From 1995 to 1997, Mr. Prendergast served as his country's Ambassador to Turkey. From 1992 to 1995, he served as High Commissioner to Kenya, and from 1989 to 1992 as High Commissioner to Zimbabwe.

From 1982 to 1986, Mr. Prendergast was Counsellor, Head of Chancery and Consul-General in Tel Aviv. Mr. Prendergast was posted to the United Kingdom Mission to the United Nations from 1979 to 1982.

Subsequent to working at the British Embassy in Ankara for two years, Mr. Prendergast was posted to London in 1967, to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Department at the Foreign Office. In 1969, he was posted to Nicosia, Cyprus, where he was Second Secretary until 1972. He then returned to London as First Secretary and desk officer for Greece. In 1973, he was posted to The Hague as First Secretary. From 1976 to 1979, Mr. Prendergast returned to London as Assistant Private Secretary to the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs."


Mr. Prendergast is married and has two daughters and two sons.

http://www.un.org/News/ossg/sg/stories/ ... t_bio.asp/
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Re: Famous Campbeltonians

Postby bill » Thu Mar 01, 2012 11:22 pm

Angus Stewart, born Campbeltown 1946.


"On 14 October 2010, the Scottish Government announced that the Queen, on the recommendation of the First Minister, Alex Salmond, had appointed Angus Stewart a Senator of the College of Justice, a judge of the country's supreme courts, the High Court of Justiciary and Court of Session. He took up the office on 5 November 2010 with the judicial title, Lord Stewart."
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Re: RODNEY PATTISON

Postby bassett » Fri May 18, 2012 9:55 am

DRUMLEMEN1 wrote:Not many will know that a Campbeltown born person has won the Olympic Gold medal at the 1968, 1972 Games and a Silver at the 1976 Games. "


Born in Campbeltown, Argyll on 4th August 1943, Rodney Stuart Pattisson can justifiably claim to be Scotland's most successful sailor ever, winning two Olympic gold and one silver medal.

.....................................................................................................


English hero exits Scots hall of fame


Published on Friday 18 May 2012 02:22

DOUBLE Olympic champion Rodney Pattisson was yesterday removed from the Scottish Sport Hall of Fame. It is the first time such action has been taken.

Pattisson, who was born in Campbeltown in 1943 but regards himself as English, said: “Hopefully this will end the myth that I am Scottish – which is what I wanted".

The sailor, who won gold medals in the Flying Dutchman class at the 1968 Games in Mexico City and again in Munich four years later, was one of the 50 original inductees into the hall of fame in 2002.

Recently, Pattisson revealed he regretted agreeing to be included in the hall of fame alongside household names such as Jock Stein, Denis Law and Allan Wells. Although he was born in Campbeltown, it was only because his father was serving at RAF Machrihanish during the war. The family returned to England a few months later.

Despite this tenuous connection, which he says he told hall of fame organisers, Pattisson was inducted. “I want the facts to be correct,” he said. “My wife Jane does not want to read my obituary saying that I am Scottish.”

A spokesman for the hall of fame said: “The hall of fame panel has met and agreed to withdraw Mr Pattisson as it fully respects the wishes of the athlete.”
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Re: Famous Campbeltonians

Postby Sweltered » Fri Jun 08, 2012 5:32 pm

Well I know where he can stick his medals. Typical Olympian...can change nationality, just because he says so...
OOH did they knock down McCaigs folly.....
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Re: Famous Campbeltonians

Postby bill » Tue Feb 26, 2013 11:02 pm

A N - E M I N E N T - C A M P B E L T O N I A N
Dugald Stewart Gilkison

by H. Ferguson.

In the last century Campbeltown made a contribution to the development of India far out of proportion to the size of the town. It would take a very long article indeed to do credit and justice to the many Campbeltonians who contributed to the Administration, Commerce and Industry of British India, and, consequently, to the new and great country India now is. Incidentally, though they may be forgotten their native town, this is not the case in India.

Dugald Stewart Gilkison was one of this worthy band, perhaps not the most famous, but certainly one of the most remarkable. He is the "eminent Campbeltonian" of this article.

DUGALD STEWART GILKISON fully deserves the title of Merchant Adventurer though in his case the Adventurer came very much first and the Merchant later. He was born on 13th March 1840 in Campbeltown, which has been the home of many leading business magnates in India. His father died in September 1842 and his mother was left with two sons, of whom D.S. Gilkison was the elder, and one daughter. She was, however, left in comfortable circumstances and was able to give the children a good education. He was educated at the Rothesay Academy, where he was taught French and German, and having a taste for modern languages, got up early in the mornings to teach himself Spanish, and by the time he left school in 1857 he had a reasonable working knowledge of all three languages. He then went into an office in Liverpool, but already the wanderlust had seized him and after eighteen months he left Scotland and joined the Foreign Legion. He was thus in time for the war which Napoleon the Third declared on Austria in April 1859, and though he was not at Magenta he fought at Solferino. France and Austria soon after that concluded a treaty, but the piping times of peace did not suit D.S.G., and his mother, after some trouble and expense, managed to buy him out of the Legion. He did not, however, return home, but went instead to the Argentine, where he led a roving life for the next three years and was actively engaged shortly afterwards in a revolutionary war in Uruguay.

In 1863 he heard of an even better war going on in North America, so he proceeded thither and fought in the 2nd Corps of Grant's Army through the last year of the Civil War. Although Lee surrendered to Grant in April 1865, D.S.G. evidently remained in the Army for a time, as, on 17th May 1865, he received his commission as 2nd Lieutenant in the Tenth New York Regiment of Infantry, and we now have anong our records his original commission signed at the city of Albany under the seal and signature of Reuben S. Fenton, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Military and Naval Forces, and countersigned by J.B. Stonehouse, Assistant Adjutant-General. It might be added that, until his death, he received a pension as a Veteran of the Civil War.

Soon after this, he returned to Scotland where his mother had settled in Glasgow, and where he tried to adapt himself to commercial life in that city, but once again the lust for travel was on him, and he went out to Point de Galle which was then the principal port of Ceylon. Here he was engaged in some capacity in the Coffee business which still flourished in the island; and here his knowledge of Spanish stood him in good stead, as he secured the appointment of Spanish Vice-Consul at Point de Galle, and by 1572 he had become Consul for Spain at the port. This was at the time an important Consular post, for the Cable had not extended further east than Point de Galle. An important despatch from Madrid to Manila had therefore to be cabled to the Consul, and by him transmitted by post to Manila, and similarly in the opposite direction. He had one interesting experience during his time of office, attending a large luncheon given by the Roman Catholic priest at Point de Galle to high Dignitaries of the Church returning to their Sees in Australia, the Philippines and China after the Ecumenical Council of 1869-70, the one which declared the doctrine of the Infallibility of the Pope. D.S.G. attended as the representative of His Most Catholic Majesty. When he resigned his post on coming to India, he was made a Knight of the Order of Isabella the Catholic, which however he did not greatly appreciate, as he was very much of the presbyterian persuasion.

He had previously married Margaret Dunlop Ralston, through whom it was understood that he had been able considerably to augment his capital resources. This is indicated by the fact that from 1879 the profits of the Firm took a decided leap upwards. They had three children; the eldest was Stewart Gilkison who went into the Army and in 1914 was a Captain in the Scottish Rifles; the younger son, James, he first took into the London Office in the hope that he would succeed him in due course, but James also preferred the Arrny and in 1914 was a Lieutenant in the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders; their only daughter, Joan, also married into the Army, her husband bcing Capt. Bramwell of the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders. They were all killed in the first war, while Mrs. Gilkison survived her husband and eventually died in 1929, and, Mrs. Bramwell, who lived at Meall Mhor, near Tarbert, died in 1945, and, considering Gilkison's views mentioned earlier, it is interesting to note that she died in the Roman Catholic Faith.

The above is only part of the article taken from the link below....................


http://web.archive.org/web/200203070739 ... page6.html
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