Six additional letters to Campbeltown have been discovered!

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Six additional letters to Campbeltown have been discovered!

Postby cgms310 » Wed Jun 04, 2008 6:57 pm

In addition to the Hector Kelly letter, I have been advised that 19 other letters have been located. Six (6) of these either came from or were sent to Campbeltown and were found in an old trunk.

I have some basic information (see below), but as they are transcribed, I will post them here for any possible links to families still in the town.

9/2/1831 Mary Kelly (Campbeltown) to her sister's husband Alexander Stewart (sister was Catherine nee Kelly Stewart in Glasgow).

23/10/1834 Alexander Stewart (Glasgow) to his mother Mrs. Archibald Stewart. Addressed to "Kilkenzie" c/o Andrew Kelly, Lochend, Campbeltown.

30/8/1839 Alexander Stewart (Glasgow) to his sister Barbara (nee Stewart) McKenzie advising her of her Sister Agnes’s passing.

9/6/1841 Alexander Stewart (Glasgow) to his sister Barbara McKenzie

1843 Alexander Stewart (Glasgow) to his sister Barbara (nee Stewart) McKenzie living at Kirk Street Campbeltown.

31/7/1865 John Stewart (Glasgow) to his mother Catherine (nee Kelly) Stewart in Campbeltown.

There are also two letters dated March 1862 from Skiptown, Australia. One of these letters refers to a Janet and Katy Stewart who were in Campbeltown, whose apparent good looks came over with their mother who was visiting Australia at the time.

Regards,


Charles.
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Re: Six additional letters to Campbeltown have been discovered!

Postby cgms310 » Fri Jun 06, 2008 2:15 pm

LETTER # 1

From my great grandfather John Kelly Stuart to his mother Catherine Stewart (nee Kelly)

Mentions the public hanging of a Dr. Pritchard in some detail.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dated Glasgow 31st July 1865

My dear Mother,

Kate arrived at our house about one o’clock today, had dinner and went to work at half past 2 o’clock, they had a fine day. We were sorry to hear that Mary was unwell, but getting better I hope you will soon be able to have more pleasure than you have had with the attack that Mary and Alick have had. I was glad to hear that Alick was better and on the fair way to recovery, Kate says he is looking well and taking his food better than he did. Our little dear Mary is not all all well. She is very much reduced you would not know her to be the same child. Joanna was with her to the Dr. today and advised her to go at once to the country. So if all is well and the day good they will leave Glasgow on Wednesday morning first for Campbeltown. We were very uneasy you did not see many of the friends yet, but I hope when you are all there you will be able to enjoy yourselves better. You will be surprised when I tell you that I was down to see the end of Dr Pritchard, he faced his doom like as if he was going to a platform to speak, he never moved the whole time even when the Executioner adjusted the rope around his neck, it was an awful scene, the drop fell, he was in eternity, but he died penitent acknowledging the justice of his sentence. Be sure and write soon, tell Alick to be good boy, and his ma will bring him something, and be nice to his little sisters, they are wearying to see him, then I will come and see him if well perhaps this day fortnight, and we will go out and catch fish for you breakfast every morning. Mother is bringing him a new hat and a nice pair of drawers, and perhaps something else, but he is to do what he is bidden by his Granma and Aunt and I will bring him something too. There is nothing new about doors.

Hoping this will find you all making better.

I remain dear Mother
Your affectionate son,
John Stuart

P.S. Give my compliments to all friends who are interested in our welfare.




The following is written at the foot of the second page in pencil.

‘Monday night.

Joanna was over at the Dr. again and he desired her not to go till Thursday or Friday till he would see how Mary was keeping as she is very weak Kate was down and told me to tell Mary that her ring was in her dresser (Jenner) when she came to pay her fairing. I will write by Wednesday.’



This letter is written later than all the others and probably originally had an envelope
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Re: Six additional letters to Campbeltown have been discovered!

Postby cgms310 » Fri Jun 06, 2008 2:22 pm

LETTER # 12


From my great great grandfather Alexander Stewart living in Glasgow, to his sister Barbara Stewart living in Kirk Street, Campbeltown.

Many families are mentioned in the appendix to this letter, there is also a cure for the Jaundice which seems to be the reason for the letter in the first place!!

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Glasgow 9 June 1841

Dear Barrabra,

I understand by Robt. Duncans letter that your Jenny has got the jaundis and that you wish to know what it was cured Mrs. Stewart. You will receive with this letter a small parcel containing the ingredients that cured her, namely the Barberry tree and groundsel, you will wash them clean in water, boil them in three chopins of water over a slow fire for 24 hours until the liquid is boiled into about one gill and when fit for drinking give it to him, but I rather think that he will not be fond of it for I am told that it is very ill liked, yet it is a great cure compared with the trash that is generally used for the Jaundis, he will vomit something like the melt of a herring, then he is cured if he has no desire to vomit give him lukewarm water to drink until it (burns-turns?) the stomach, be sure that you do not give him strong meat or drink give him thin pottage and small beer or water, a shave of tested (toasted?) bread without butter and cups of coffee if you give him anything stronger than the above for eight days after the vomit you injure him but after that you may give nutritive food, and I hope that he will be spared for a blessing to you, and as it is a dangerous and troublesome disease I hope that you will apply the cure as soon as possible. I have sent you some grounsel that you may see it, and that you would get it fresh in some of the gardens, or on the roadside, six stalks of it is sufficient to add to the Barbarry tree.

I am getting so sleepy my pen is like to abstain from parting with the ink (totally) I will therefore conclude by wishing you to remind me to my sisters and brothers and to those that are their bosom companions and their families.

And I remain Dear Sister you

Your affectionate Brother

Alexn. Stewart

Addressed to Barbara Stewart
Kirk Street
Campbeltown

Old letter sealed with wax.
Written alongside the letter on the first page is written. You will receive the parcel from Miss Jean Carmichael.




On the inner page of the letter is addressed the following letter to his sister Janet who is buried in the Glasgow Southern Cemetery behind him. She eventually married Robert Robert Duncan.

Dear Jannet

I have not seen Robert last Sabbath when he called at out house as usual when down at Uncle Peter’s, but I understand that he is quite well. John and his family are all well, so is Mr Glen and his family. Sandy McDermot went to see them with Robt. Last Sunday for the first time since he came out, he is likewise well and so I our little family. Mrs. Gorman has gone to her own house at Kilkerran but little Agnis is with Uncle John K, saw little Arch and I make myself clear he looks worse than usual. The times are Noric dull with us here and nothing but a bad look out for – better trading. There is a great noise here about (?Jes) Paterson Glenramekil who absconded from his employers with eight thousand six hundred pounds, and there is a reward of two hundred pounds for him on the corner of our streets. I have nothing of importance to communicate at this time. I received a letter from Alex.r McKendrick yesterday informing me that Mary is in good health, I hope that she keeps herself Klian and combed. Tell her that I wish her to attend to her book occasionally and to learn as much galick as possible, I intend to go and bring her home in the course of four weeks.
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Re: Six additional letters to Campbeltown have been discovered!

Postby cgms310 » Mon Jun 09, 2008 10:44 pm

Letter No 7

Girvan 9th Feby 1831

Mr Alex Stewart
Smith
Care of Mr Donald Johnston
111Stockwell Street
Glasgow

My Dear Friends

We received yours in due course and should have written ere this time. I have telling Dugald several times that I is a shame for him never to think of writing to his friends, but he just hearkens me and says, write yes. They had a very unpleasant passage from Glasgow that time, it was just as well you did not answer any letter by post, for it is likely you would have informed me of there taking the steamboat and a most dreadful day it was here. We are very glad to hear of your welfare, we hope you will succeed well in business, and be well situated for a partner. I suppose none of you think of coming this length. Catherine is not confused by a small family, as you speak only of your little boy, when you speak of Donald Johnstons children. I am very sorry for Mrs Johnston poor woman it was certainly a very severe trial, be pleased to make my best wishes to them both. We are all well, the children are all stout and healthy. Mary used to be very delicate and tender eyed, but she is now quite well. My little boy is stout of is age, he has walked about four months and can go into a neighbours house easily. I think he is very like your boy when I saw him, a good deal of the spirit of the clan in him. I have some intention of being thro at Kingdom about the month of May I wish Catherine would come out a week or two before, and I would go in with her or if you promise to come out with me when I would return. I assure you nothing would give me more pleasure. We intend to remove of this house in the course of a month and after we have ourselves all settled I intend to take my trip, the steamboat will be going by that time, so I hope you will think of it and let us know. I delivered Hector’s compts to Mrs Clark, she says he might have been 10th both (?) the trouble and expense of coming this length to see her neither of them would be so great and he might be assured of a hearty welcome, indeed she wonders he never thinks of it. Hes (or Hec) and I live on very good terms, on the best terms indeed, whether feigned or real I cannot tell but it is good in the meantime and I hope it will not turn out otherwise as long as we are near each other. She is a brisk woman at her age and has every appearance of living a long time yet, be kind enough to remember me in the kindest manner to Donald Kelly and his wife and Hectors. I hope they will all be in better spirits then when I saw them, With best wishes for you both I am

My Dear Friends your aff Sister
Mary Kelly


I quite forgot to say that Dugal has got the length of being an elder some time ago in our established church.
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Re: Six additional letters to Campbeltown have been discovered!

Postby cgms310 » Mon Jun 09, 2008 10:47 pm

Letter No 3

From Alexander Stewart to his son John in very spidery shaky writing. Glasgow written and crossed out

Glasgow (crossed out)
19th August 52
Campeltown

DearJohn

We have just arrived here at 7 o’clock (pm) we left Girvan at half past 11 am. Arrived in Ayr. I left Mother and Katy there and I took the train to Troon and stopped only 15 minutes as our fare has been paid for this place, the housewife was from home at Glenhead. The friends in Girvan are well except Mrs McConnell, she is getting better. Mr McConnell will pay you a visit some of these days before his departure for Australia. Most likely you will have Mr Dugald Kelly with you as I am writing this. We have taken tickets for Southend tomorrow morning. Let me have a letter from you Tuesday first Southend send me ? some paper.
Let me know the news of the shop. No more, you see by the above that it is time to stop and I am Dear John

Your affectionate Father

Alex Stewart
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Re: Six additional letters to Campbeltown have been discovered!

Postby Bobbie En Tejas » Mon Jun 09, 2008 11:46 pm

I"m fascinated.. Wonder what ol' Doc Pritchard did!
Some people die at 21 but aren't buried until they are 65.
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Re: Six additional letters to Campbeltown have been discovered!

Postby cgms310 » Tue Jun 10, 2008 4:12 am

Hi Bobbbie!


Here is what I found!!


Rev. Dr. Norman Macleod's Account of the Execution of Dr. Pritchard.



On the 3rd of July, 1865, Dr. Edward William Pritchard, a medical man of previously good reputation in the city of Glasgow, was placed at the bar of the High Court of Justici­ary in Edinburgh, charged with the murder by poisoning of his wife and mother-in-law, within or near the dwelling­ house, Clarence Place, Sauchiehall Street. The evidence dis­covered him to be a polished, hypocritical, and callous criminal of the deepest and blackest kind.

A special feature of the trial, which extended over five days, was the amount and excellence of the medical evidence led for the prosecution and the defence. In this respect it is one of the most noteworthy cases in Scottish criminal annals. Pritchard was found guilty, and sentenced to be executed at Glasgow in front of the south prison at the Green, on the 28th July, 1865. The following account of the last scene was written by Dr. Norman Macleod of the Barony Church, in a letter to his wife.

"Friday.-Please do not excite yourself when you see by the papers that I have been with Pritchard to the last. I thought it rather cowardly to let Oldham of St. Mary's Episcopal Church do this work alone when we had shared the previous portion of it. So I offered to go, and I am glad I did. I saw it all from first to last; was with him in his cell, and walked at his back till he reached the scaffold. As to his behaviour, strange to say, no patriot dying for his country, no martyr dying for his faith, could have behaved with greater calmness, dignity, and solemnity! He was kind and courteous (as he always was) to all; prayed with us with apparent deep earnestness; told Oldham to tell his sister that he repented of a life of transgression, was glad the second confession was suppressed, etc. He said before the magistrates, with a low bow and a most solemn voice " ‘I acknowledge the justice of my sentence.' He had told those about him on leaving his cell " ` I want no one to support me,' and so he marched to the scaffold with a deadly pale face but erect head, as if he marched to the sound of music. He stood upright as a bronze statue, with the cap over his face and the rope round his neck. When the drop fell, all was quiet. Marvellous and complex character! Think of a man so firm as to say to Oldham " ` I am glad you have come with your gown and bands! "' Dr. Macleod adds" Strange to say, I felt no excitement whatever, but calm and solemn. I gazed at him while praying for his poor soul till the last. But I won't indulge in sensation sketches. May God forgive all my poor sinful services, and accept of me and mine as lost sinners redeemed through Jesus Christ! " I am forever set against all public executions. They brutalise the people, and have no more meaning to them than bull-baiting or a gladiatorial combat. And then the fuss, the babble and foam of gossip, the reporting for the press, etc., over that black sea of crime and death! "

Certain it is that this was the last criminal execution in public in the city of Glasgow.
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Re: Six additional letters to Campbeltown have been discovered!

Postby cgms310 » Wed Aug 20, 2008 3:21 pm

I received a telephone call to tell me that this public execution was mentioned in a recent documentary by the BBC.

Did anyone see this?

Regards,



Charles.
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Re: Six additional letters to Campbeltown have been discovered!

Postby ionnsaigh » Mon Sep 15, 2008 7:18 pm

I found reading those letters absolutely fascinating. What struck me was the numerous mentions of ill health. The bit aboot the wee sick lassie, the cure for Jaundice, Noric dull ? . Jes Paterson absconding with a fortune a reward of two hundred pounds
The execution, who needs tv.
thanks for that.
Mick
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Re: Six additional letters to Campbeltown have been discovered!

Postby cgms310 » Tue Dec 02, 2008 3:10 pm

UPDATE

During a recent search of Australian records, I came across two letters from Australia from my family of Campbeltown Stewarts.

I knew these letters existed, however the originals are in such poor condition that they cannot be handled without further disintegration. What I did discover however is that they were photocopied back in 1964 while my brother worked in Australia House in London (thank you John!). These were then stored in the ANL (Australian National Library) in Melbourne and thanks to the efforts of my cousin Martin Campbell-Stewart, he has kindly ordered copies and will scan and e-mail them to me.

Once I have had an opportunity to view them and dissect the content, I will gladly post the copies on the Kintyre Forum, as I believe they will give further insight into the life and times of all our ancestors, who for many reasons were forced from the shores of Scotland, to find a new life for themselves.

Watch this space!


Regards,




Charles.
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