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Local Songs and Poetry

PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2006 9:30 am
by EMDEE
:idea:

I am taking the liberty of starting a thread here which I would hope would attract a great number of contributions.

Kintyre has a wealth of musical heritage in terms of poetry and songs from the area. Much of this heritage is probably in danger of being lost through the generations as it is essentially an oral culture. This cannot be allowed to happen if we can preserve our traditions. There has never been a better way of doing this than through this medium. We cannot allow our traditions to die.

There must be many songs and poems peculiar to the area which we never hear, and many forum members must know some of them. I have heard some pretty obscure local songs over the years.

I would ask forum members if they would like to contribute something unique here and create a repository of local poetry and songs. Many of them may be very old and traditional, but if possible it would be good to acknowledge the author if known. It would also be good to name the tune of the songs if they are known. Some local songs use the tunes of better known Scottish songs. This is quite common throughout Scotland, I think

Keep it clean :)

PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2006 9:36 am
by EMDEE
Here's one to start with, probably one of the better known ones:


Flory Loynachan

O, it buitie be an ogly thing
That mougres thus ower me.
For I scrabed at mysel' yestreen,
And couldna bab an e'e.
My heart is a' to muilins minched.
Brye, smuirach, daps and gum,
I'm a poor cruichach, spalyin' scrae,
My horts hae struck me dumb.


Dear Flory Loynachan, if thou
Thro' Sanna's soun' wert toss'd,
And rouchled like a shougie-shoo
In a veshal with one mast;
Though the night was makan' for a roil,
Though rallaich were the sea,
Though scorlins warpled my thowl pins,
My shallop wad reach thee.


Thour't not a hochlan scleurach, dear,
As many trooshlach be;
Nor I a claty skybal thus
To sclaffer efter thee;
Yet haing the meishach, whare first
I felt love's mainglin' smart,
And haing the boosach dyvour too,
Who spong'd from me thine heart.


O! rhane a Yolus Cronie - quick -
Across this rumpled brain!
Bring hickery-pickery - bring wallink,
Droshachs, to soothe my pain!
Fire water - fill a spoucher full -
These fryan stouns to stay!
For like a sporrow's scaldachan
I'm gosping night and day.


Were I the Laird o' Achnaglach,
Or Kilmashenachan fair,
Crockstaplemore, Kilwheepnach,
Feochaig or Ballochgair,
Did I inherit Tuyinreoch,
Drumgarve, or Ballochantee,
Creishlach, or Coeran - daing the bit
I'd fauchat them a' for thee!


O, the Clabbydhu, it loves the Trinch,
The Cruban the quay-neb,
While the Anachan and Brollachan,
They love the mussell-ebb.
The Muirachban the Dorling loves,
And the Gleshan, and Guildee,
They love to plouder through the Loch,
But Flory, I love thee!

PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2006 6:07 pm
by Ticketty Boo!
As a young lad, I recall hearing a local lady singing a song called "Carradale" in the Crubin one night.

Does anybody know the words?

Songs.

PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2006 8:14 pm
by Dunc
I was sent a song other day...very topical..Think Malky has a copy I dont know how to put it on.

Dunc

The Follinash

PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:10 am
by Mary G
I have a vague recollection of some aspects of this ... but it may just be that I know all the places so well. Found it recently on the site of the Gaelic College on Skye, collected as part of a wider research project into Gaelic in Kintyre. Well worth a look http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/~sm00gt00/Cinntire/A%27%20chiad%20duilleag.htm

The Follinash

Dohl a' Voomper had a brewing
In Kilmaschenachan Glen
And of foreshot strong and caochan too
A greedy squeep has teken
For Dohl had fund a fallachan
An eileance o' his ain
Had muckle clauts o' sprudan left
To him in Colindrain.

Now Dohl quo' he to Khetch his wife
'Run doon to Penlan Mill
For Peggy Mhor here yesterday
Her doorie she did kill
And fesh saut gleshans frae the chop
And collops off the roun
And, be haingt, we'd hae a follinash
In Kilmaschenchan toon.'

Khetch in her brat a kaeper took
And put her sclaffers on
And doon the hill to Penlan Mill
She spascheringly has gone
But Peggy Mhor her chop did steek
For her peats they were to cast
And in ths shottle of her kist
The rouns were lockit fast.

Anooth a boortrie bush sat Khetch
While tears her boose did wah
Then back to Kilmaschenachan ran
Ill wi' the water brash
And thus she unto Dohl did say
'O goeloch Dohl,' quoth she
'You and your follinash may gang
To Tighinreoch for me.'

Come raise your meesanach every one
And rant this song wi' glee
He that will not in chorus join
A claty bulge is he
Doon on our hunkers let us crooch
And dance Cockuddy roon
While we celebrate the follinash
In Kilmaschenachan toon.

The introduction says that this song was written down by a Latimer MacInnes, around 1910. It describes the song as bilingual, using both Gaelic and Scots English together, in a language that was used by many of the older people in Campbeltown at the start of the 20th century.

PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 11:01 am
by petewick
Always remember the following songs being sang at New Year, mainly by the older ones in the company:

The Road tae Drumlemin', Sweet Island Davaar and Stewarton Corner, The Weavers o' Glenreigh.
I'm sure there was more, but a lot of water under the bridge since I've heard them.

petewick

The Follinash

PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 7:51 pm
by EMDEE
I've never even heard of this one before! I think it probably dates from the same sort of era as "Flory Loynachan", as the gaelic influence seems to be there too. Excellent find!

I can see what you mean by your knowing the places so well. :wink:

The song Carradale.

PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 8:06 pm
by jdcarra
Ticketty Boo! wrote:As a young lad, I recall hearing a local lady singing a song called "Carradale" in the Crubin one night.

Does anybody know the words?


CARRADALE

Chorus
Carradale Carradale there’s music in that name
A melody reminding me of youth and love and hame
I’m ever longing for the day I’ll take the homeward trail
Once more to gaze from Dippen Brae’s on lovely Carradale.

(1)
I’ve often trod the winding path that skirt’s Kilbrannan’s shore
And waded thro’ the heather bell’s that blossom on Tormore
From Castle Rock at eventide I’ve watched the boats set sail
I’ve wished them luck and safely back at morn to Carradale
Chorus

(2)
But come the day I’m on my way from Spion Kop I see
The Arran hills beneath the moon, a sight so sweet to me
From Claonaig hill to Cruban Boy shines out it’s welcome hail
The wanderer will soon be home to bide in Carradale.
Chorus


(3)
By Escairt and by Crossaig Bay
The winding track I steer
And then the light’s of Carradale from Sperasaig appear
Like heavenly stars to guide me on past Cour to Sunadale
Up Grogport hill and down the glen I’m home in Carradale.
Chorus

PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 9:16 pm
by Ship called Dignity
Terry - if you are reading this can you send me your e-mail again - I deleted it by mistake! :oops: :oops:

So much spam!

Send it to daviethep@aol.com too

Re: The song Carradale.

PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2006 4:10 pm
by Beachcomber
jdcarra wrote:CARRADALE

Chorus
Carradale Carradale there’s music in that name
A melody reminding me of youth and love and hame
I’m ever longing for the day I’ll take the homeward trail
Once more to gaze from Dippen Brae’s on lovely Carradale.


Good one, JD.

Argyll was singing that in the bar of the Arran Distillery the other week...

Carradale - different lyrics

PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2006 9:41 pm
by Mary G
My aunt (a native of Carradale) and her husband famously sang a beautiful harmony version of this song at all family weddings and parties, and it is a firm favourite of our sizeable clan. I did not recognise it fully, as transcribed by jdcarra, and checked it out with my mother (born and brought up in Carradale, and now 85). She learned the song directly from Charles Reppke, who composed it, and confirmed that the version she learned, as she recalls it, is a bit different to the one above. Chorus and verse 1 are the same, however we have completely different verses 2 and 3.

It is often the case that indigenous and traditional songs will evolve, since they are mainly handed on orally. It could be that Charles Reppke added two other verses; maybe the memory plays tricks; or perhaps someone else has cleverly added on additional stanzas. Whatever – it is a great song, and those who don’t know it should make sure that they get to hear it – preferably in the village hall or the Cruban!

Verses 2 and 3, as recalled by my mother:

(2)
When I am sad and weary and my heart is full of care,
I try to picture youthful scenes and live them o’er again.
My thoughts take flight across the years and memory rends the veil:
Once more I see, revealed to me, my native Carradale.

(3)
In fancy oft my spirit takes the road up from the sea
From Moineruadh and Drumbuie and on to Coire-na-sith.
And whether it be summer’s sun, or winter’s driving rain:
Once more I see, revealed to me, my native Carradale.

Re: Carradale - different lyrics

PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2006 11:23 pm
by jdcarra
Mary G wrote:My aunt (a native of Carradale) and her husband famously sang a beautiful harmony version of this song at all family weddings and parties, and it is a firm favourite of our sizeable clan. I did not recognise it fully, as transcribed by jdcarra, and checked it out with my mother (born and brought up in Carradale, and now 85). She learned the song directly from Charles Reppke, who composed it, and confirmed that the version she learned, as she recalls it, is a bit different to the one above. Chorus and verse 1 are the same, however we have completely different verses 2 and 3.

It is often the case that indigenous and traditional songs will evolve, since they are mainly handed on orally. It could be that Charles Reppke added two other verses; maybe the memory plays tricks; or perhaps someone else has cleverly added on additional stanzas. Whatever – it is a great song, and those who don’t know it should make sure that they get to hear it – preferably in the village hall or the Cruban!

Verses 2 and 3, as recalled by my mother:

(2)
When I am sad and weary and my heart is full of care,
I try to picture youthful scenes and live them o’er again.
My thoughts take flight across the years and memory rends the veil:
Once more I see, revealed to me, my native Carradale.

(3)
In fancy oft my spirit takes the road up from the sea
From Moineruadh and Drumbuie and on to Coire-na-sith.
And whether it be summer’s sun, or winter’s driving rain:
Once more I see, revealed to me, my native Carradale.


Mary

I got the above which I posted version from Janette (McKinnon) but my wife remembers your verses also. Will have a word with some of the more elderly about the different verses.

PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2006 8:18 am
by witchnettle
[Will have a word with some of the more elderly about the different verses.)
you'll be chatting to the bochan and morenish then JD, best to go in the afternoon when they had a chance to rouse themselves x :D

PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2006 8:25 am
by ullean's mum
think morenish is away on an island adventure trip today,thought i saw the tractor parking up at the terminal in oban :lol:

Carradale - lyrics

PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2006 10:40 am
by Mary G
All very intriguing, jdcarra ... Janette is part of that very clan I mentioned, and the aunt and uncle I referred to are her's as well!

It does seem as if, over the years, verses have been added - nothing wrong with that, in my view. What is important is that the original words and sentiments are not lost at the same time. Asking around may well reveal the provenance of, what appears to be, a minimum of five verses. Maybe there are more lurking out there!