Kintyre Vernacular

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Postby general jack o'niell » Wed Mar 19, 2008 9:34 pm

thought of another word while postin elsewhere

neefed, or neef.......... to steal, usually something small as in a child stealing a sweet from a shop, he neefed a bag of crisps fae cathie stewarts, or teds or waggotts.

skite......... you can skite a stone across water

skite....... strike something a glancing blow

go on the skite.......... go out for the evening with the intention of getting very drunk
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Postby EMDEE » Thu Mar 20, 2008 12:54 am

Haven't heard the word "neef" for a long time.

Mention of “neefin’” sweeties reminds me of a story that relates to how local or regional words can give the wrong impression and give things a completely different meaning.

Some years ago Anneka Rice on her TV programme "Challenge Anneka" was buying some stuff at an ice- cream van in Northern Ireland. She looked completely shocked when the man at the van asked her if she would like a “poke”.

Being Welsh, she had never heard of a “poke o’ sweeties”.
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Postby westport321 » Thu Mar 20, 2008 1:40 am

fizog fissog as far as I can remember = face[size=18][/size][color=indigo][/color]
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Postby ionnsaigh » Thu Mar 20, 2008 4:15 am

A mind wurkin wae a guy - who hid lernin difficulties - wan day he wiz gettin ready (dressed) A asked him if he waanted anythin - he sayed bits - a said bits - bits a whit - mae bits he siad - mae bits. This went oan fur at least ten minutes - it seemed mare tae me - a dunno who wiz the maist upset him ur me. The guy came fae a mining village in Ayrshire. A hid tae go an ask wan a the other workers - tae help him. Five minutes efter - he came doon the sters laughin - pointin tae his feet sayin mae bits mae bits. A learned sumthin that day. Bits :oops:
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Postby bill » Thu Mar 20, 2008 12:34 pm

Is going for the messages(groceries) local to the town?
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Postby general jack o'niell » Thu Mar 20, 2008 1:27 pm

only in certain parts of town, over on the askomil side and down kilkerran its "running errands" and its something you get the help or "daily" to do.

does anywhere else use the term hoovering instead of vacum? i don't know so i had to flask
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Postby EMDEE » Thu Mar 20, 2008 1:45 pm

bill wrote:Is going for the messages(groceries) local to the town?


Think I've seen that one discussed in the Scots Magazine. Seems to be generally Scottish, as well as Kintyre.
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Postby ionnsaigh » Thu Mar 20, 2008 3:28 pm

Ave jist finished the hooverin - noo am aff tae get the messages - fair scunnerd - so am ur .
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Postby ionnsaigh » Thu Mar 20, 2008 8:19 pm

Stick to yur guns
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Postby general jack o'niell » Sun Mar 23, 2008 2:25 am

that last post could be described as being "gort"
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Postby Sheik Yir Erse » Tue Apr 15, 2008 3:34 pm

There appears to be a number of derivatives of the adjective relating to 'hoor'.

There's "hoora" or "hooruva" or "hoors own"

It was a hoora night!

It was a hooruva night!

It was one hoors own night!

Is there a difference between any of the expressions?
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Postby petewick » Wed Apr 16, 2008 10:56 am

Doinker = jobbie.

Only ever heard in in the toon.
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Words !!

Postby SARID » Wed Apr 16, 2008 5:44 pm

I can assure you, Gen J, as someone born and brought up in Carradale, nobody there pronounced 7 as " seevan " or 11 as " eleeven "-------- that was pure Campbeltown. We used more"e's " and elongated the word, and as a result, I can well remember how we were mocked by the Campbeltonians because of our pronounciation when at the " Grammar "
We had, I have to admit, a more " singsong " pronounciation.
"wee trouchlach " ----- used by my Father as a form of endearment when talking to his Grandchildren,and only recently I discovered it really means"slovenly worthless person "
Was " wild", as in "wild an' calm " peculiar to Carradale, or used throughout Kintyre ?
Has anyone been at the receiving end o'someone taking "a wild Pallourie " ( spelling ?? )
Bussack---------- someone withan ill tempered expression.
Boorach------ again preceded by "wild " to describe being in a mess.
Sprachle------ struggling, usually upwards.
Gomeral------- a stupid person. My Father always put " stupid" in front, but there was no need !
Gollachan------- noisy gathering, again, often "wild " used to describe
Kich------filth or dirt of any kind, including excrement
Humphlock describes a mound o. dead grass, and at Portrigh the children used the whole word, whereas we in another area of Carradale, spoke about a "humph" o' grass"
Jalouse------- I had no memory of ever hearing that word, yet it was familiar to my Sister.
Boak-------retch or vomit
Soorack--------sour tasting leaf from a wee woodland flower we picked and ate.
Pig-nuts------ root of a plant we dug up and ate.( I cant recall the name of these plants , but we all lived to tell the tale )W
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Postby petewick » Thu Apr 17, 2008 12:37 pm

There's also Dalintober Gaelic, can't remember any off hand.
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Re: Kintyre Vernacular

Postby EMDEE » Wed May 28, 2008 6:32 pm

On looking through the poetry and language sections of the North Antrim Culture and Heritage Forum, I was quite surprised that the "Ulster Scots" or "Ullans" language seems to have a lot in common with the Kintyre dialect in the way of words and pronunciations. Two words in particular that I noticed were "doag" and "wile", which I thought were purely Kintyre.

The historical connections between the two communities must have been a lot stronger than they have been in more recent years.
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